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Thursday, March 8, 2018

Kollur Mookambigai Temple

16 February 2018: Our Karnataka temple tour continued. We checked out of our rooms at Sringeri and left for Kollur via the scenic Agumbe ghats covering the distance of 110 kms in approximately 2 hours.We reached Kollur by 12.00 noon and immediately proceeded for darshan. The temple inner prakaram reminded me of Guruvayur Temple in Kerala. There was already a long queue of devotees in the general darshan. We bought Rs.100/- special darshan tickets which helped us cut short the waiting period.The entrance into the sanctum sanctorum was quite narrow and three queues of devotees were simultaneously allowed to enter - free queue, the Rs.100/- queue & the Rs.500/- queue. This resulted in a bit of elbowing and jostling near the entrance. Once inside things were controlled again. We had a wonderful darsan of Goddess Mookambigai.
This famous Mookambika Temple is situated on the banks of the never drying river Sauparnika.The gold plated vimanam and copper roofs attracts thousands of devotees and is considered one of the most important places of pilgrimage attracting pilgrims from all over India.
 The Goddess Mookambika is in the form of Jyotir-Linga incorporating both Shiva and Shakthi. The Panchaloha image (five element mixed metal) of the Goddess on Shree Chakra is believed to have been consecrated by Adi Shankaracharya during his visit to this place. There is also an exquisite sculpture of Panchamukha Ganesha.
After darshan we had lunch at the Mahalakshmi vegetarian restaurant - exquisite aloo and gobi paranthas along with refreshing thirst quenching lassis & milk shakes. Our appetite fully satiated and thirst thoroughly quenched we clambered back into our Etios sedan for our drive to Murudeswara.
For more details about this temple,poojas & sevas log onto: Mookambika Temple
The Rs.100/- queue
Devotees who have completed darshan taking a relaxed over view
Twin Dwaja Sthambhas or Flag Staffs - common feature in all Hindu Temples
The chariot that is used to seat the processional Goddess on festival days
The copper roofings
View of the temple from outside
Instructions to devotees before entering the temple
Entrance to the Mahalakshmi Residency & Restaurant
The lunch was satisfying

2 comments:

  1. The chariot seems to be a recurrent element in Hindu temples. The copper roofs are indeed an attraction.
    Your pictures make me feel great respect for the temple and for the masses of people waiting to enter the temple.

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  2. Nice detail and photos on the temple.

    ReplyDelete